The Phoenix ADA’s push for diabetes research and prevention funding with Congressman David Schweikert’s office!

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Once again, I am impressed with the Phoenix American Diabetes Association’s efforts to further the diabetes cause. I am honored to be a volunteer with this organization. I am thankful that the ADA allows me to represent their organization. They also let me announce my position as a T1 operating The Diabetes Coach consultancy. Providing emotional support, physical support, and guidance for children and adults living with diabetes is paramount for me. I am exposed to tremendous opportunities through the generosity of the Phoenix ADA office. Educating, fundraising, and advocating for the diabetic population is a necessary step in allowing people living with diabetes better and healthier lives.

Today I was proud to participate with other ADA leaders and meet with U.S. Congressman David Schweikert’s staff. We were able to discuss the statistics for those living with diabetes, share our personal stories, and ask for funding for important research and education. The ADA office here has been diligent in trying to set up several meetings with congressmen and congresswomen around our state. These opportunities enable others in positions of leadership to become more educated about diabetes, the daily routines required to manage this disease, the financial burden of diabetes, and the progress on research and finding a cure.

As many of us know, there is great misunderstanding between the various types of diabetes, causes, and treatments. Educating people about the differences between type one and type two diabetes is crucial. As a whole, we need to come together to raise awareness for the benefit of anyone living with diabetes. It should not matter if one was diagnosed with T1 or T2, due to genetics, environmental triggers, or lifestyle decisions. Any diabetes causes chain reactions in health conditions of so many other body systems. As I heard today, “I don’t know many other diseases that directly affect the health of heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, nerve damage, amputations, blindness, and stroke as much as diabetes”. Here are some of the basic facts of diabetes:
- Almost 30 million people have diabetes
- 86 million have prediabetes
- 1 out of 9 people in Arizona has diabetes
- 1 out of 3 adults in our country and 1 out of 2 among minority populations will have diabetes by 2050 if present trends continue
- Total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2012 was $245 billion- a 41% increase since 2007

Here are some basic facts about the American Diabetes Association:
- awarded $440,000+ in camperships to kids in financial need
- hosted over 6,500 children at diabetes summer camps
- funded 400 researchers advancing prevention, treatment and progress toward a cure
- trained 2,206 school personnel at workshops to assist children with diabetes
- distributed 10,000+ Wisdom Kits to families with a child diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes
- Assembled 18,000 researchers and clinicians to share the latest discoveries and breakthroughs at scientific sessions
- educated 30,000 health professionals on ways to improve patient care

There are many working to cure diabetes and better our lives. I thank those in the trenches. I thank The Phoenix American Diabetes Association and Congressman David Schweikert’s office for taking the time to learn, review, and consider the importance of curing diabetes for all of us! Any of those living with diabetes can speak to their congressional representatives about this disease. We need to speak up. This is a detrimental and devastating disease. Let’s find a cure!

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